According to a release, Starbucks said the lid is now available in more than 8,000 stores in the USA and Canada for select beverages, including Draft Nitro and Cold Foam.

This would apply to its more than 28,000 company operated and licensed stores, the coffee giant announced on Monday (Jul 9).

To eliminate straws, Starbucks is transitioning from the flat, plastic lids that require them, to ones that feature a raised lip you can drink from.

Instead, its beverages will be capped with strawless lids - reminiscent of an "adult sippy cup" - or served with straws made from alternative materials "including paper or compostable plastic", according to a statement.

Other companies have been ditching plastic straws as bans on the item have gone into place. The company already offers alternative straws in Seattle.

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However, Lesnar tested positive for a banned substance and was suspended for a year. On Saturday, on the greatest night of his athletic career, he recalled that moment.

Local government officials across the country are considering banning plastic straws, and some Charlottesville businesses have gotten a head start. Similar proposals are being considered in places like NY and San Francisco.

The announcement from McDonald's followed an April proposal by the United Kingdom government to ban plastic straws in the country.

The issue is coming up in company boardrooms, though Starbucks is taking the lead among large food chains. And it's a part of Starbucks' $10 million investment in creating recyclable and compostable cups around the world.

For users who still want their drinks with a straw, the company said paper or biodegradable plastic will be available by request.

While plastic drinking straws have become one of the more high-profile issues environmentally, they make up only about 4 percent of the plastic trash by number of pieces, and far less by weight. Straws add up to about 2,000 tons of the almost 9 million tons of plastic waste that ends up in the water each year.


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