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The proposed resolution says Prince Mohammed was in control of security forces at the time of Khashoggi's murder and that the Senate has "a high level of confidence" that the prince was complicit in the killing. Supporters of the resolution, like Sen.

"I would imagine in a Democratic administration, I would be all over them for being in the pocket of Saudi Arabia", Graham said of Mattis and Pompeo.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has pushed to keep worldwide attention on the murder - the order for which he says came from the highest levels of the Saudi Arabian government - even as US President Donald Trump has said that Washington should not take action that would undermine its relationship with the kingdom. "We're trying to get everything together so we do something constructive".

"The current construct is not sustainable", Graham added.

However, a USA official told NBC that Khalid is not expected to be expelled from the country and would continue on as ambassador.

Following a private Central Intelligence Agency briefing on Tuesday, republican senator Lindsey Graham said he had "high confidence" the Saudi leader had a role in the murder and added "you have to be wilfully blind" to disagree.

The South Carolina Republican described the Saudi royal as "a wrecking ball", "crazy" and "dangerous". Graham said that may be true, but there is certainly a "smoking bonesaw", alluding to the murder weapon suspected to have killed Khashoggi.

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Alberta Premier Rachel Notley and her cabinet have put the legal wheels in motion to begin cutting oil production. Notley called the production cut a hard decision because there is not consensus in the industry.

"There's not a smoking gun, there's a smoking saw", said Graham, referring to reports that the Saudi team had included a forensic expert who arrived in Istanbul with equipment to dismember Khashoggi's body. The resolution cites the 1973 War Powers Resolution passed in the wake of the Vietnam war that asserts Congress's role in authorizing war.

The clear and biting assessment put Republican senators at odds with the White House, which has steadfastly refused to cast blame on Saudi Arabia's leadership for the death of Khashoggi, a United States resident and Washington Post columnist. He said finding a compromise will be hard because some lawmakers don't want to tie Yemen to the Khashoggi killing.

While the Trump administration has repeatedly distinguished Khashoggi's murder and the war in Yemen as separate issues, lawmakers are tying both together as a showcase of how blank-check support for Saudi Arabia erodes USA moral standing. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.) said, "All evidence points to that, that all this leads back to the crown prince". "Maybe he did and maybe he didn't!".

Lawmakers are likely to use the debate to call for Saudi Arabia to be held accountable for its behavior and reject the Trump administration's policy of keeping close ties with the kingdom, counting on its leaders to keep oil prices down as he ramps up sanctions on the kingdom's rival, Iran.

"There are lots of Republicans who are going to try to water this down, but they'll have to find 50 votes, and I'm not sure that they have 50 votes for a substitute". "It doesn't matter if journalists have been killed in other countries".

The Saudi foreign minister Adel al-Jubeir meanwhile was also in Washington Friday to represent his country at the funeral of former president George H.W. Bush, according to Baeshen.

Speaking to reporters after the NATO Foreign Minister's meeting in Brussels, Mevlut Cavusoglu said a probe into the killing of the Saudi journalist is ongoing.


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